Managing Waste in the Future

Tell us how we can best manage waste in the future.

Sunshine Coast Council needs your help identifying ways we can manage our household waste that are easy to do, cost effective and kind to the environment.

Due to changes in state government policy and planning for a new domestic waste contract in 2014, it's time to review the way we manage our rubbish.

There are a number of factors for us to consider: How do we continue to reduce landfill? Do garden cuttings belong in landfill? What else can we do with food scraps? Are we willing to further sort our rubbish into a third bin? Are there facilities that can help reduce landfill?

New forum questions will be added weekly over the month of November so please bookmark this page and visit often.

Have your say about how we deal with waste in the future!

Tell us how we can best manage waste in the future.

Sunshine Coast Council needs your help identifying ways we can manage our household waste that are easy to do, cost effective and kind to the environment.

Due to changes in state government policy and planning for a new domestic waste contract in 2014, it's time to review the way we manage our rubbish.

There are a number of factors for us to consider: How do we continue to reduce landfill? Do garden cuttings belong in landfill? What else can we do with food scraps? Are we willing to further sort our rubbish into a third bin? Are there facilities that can help reduce landfill?

New forum questions will be added weekly over the month of November so please bookmark this page and visit often.

Have your say about how we deal with waste in the future!

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    Regardless of how we manage our waste in the future, it is going to cost more. The carbon tax and state waste levy mean the cost of landfill will increase. The introduction of an alternative approach to landfill is  expected to cost each household an extra $3 or $4 a week, but ensures we recover resources and extend the life of our landfills.

    What do you think about these costs? Does it give you peace of mind if the additional cost is going towards a facility that will recover organic waste or the energy from waste?

    Regardless of how we manage our waste in the future, it is going to cost more. The carbon tax and state waste levy mean the cost of landfill will increase. The introduction of an alternative approach to landfill is  expected to cost each household an extra $3 or $4 a week, but ensures we recover resources and extend the life of our landfills.

    What do you think about these costs? Does it give you peace of mind if the additional cost is going towards a facility that will recover organic waste or the energy from waste?

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    Many Councils are now providing residents with a third bin for organic or green waste. Green waste that goes to landfill produces greenhouse gases that are harmful to the environment. Green bins can contain garden waste, food scraps or both. The organic waste can then be processed and used as compost suitable for landscaping or agricultural use.

    What would be the benefits of a third green bin? Would you use it for garden and food waste? Why or why not? What would be the challenges for people using a third bin?

    Many Councils are now providing residents with a third bin for organic or green waste. Green waste that goes to landfill produces greenhouse gases that are harmful to the environment. Green bins can contain garden waste, food scraps or both. The organic waste can then be processed and used as compost suitable for landscaping or agricultural use.

    What would be the benefits of a third green bin? Would you use it for garden and food waste? Why or why not? What would be the challenges for people using a third bin?

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    One option for Council is to establish a facility that can process your normal rubbish bin and sort the organic waste (food scraps and garden waste) from the normal rubbish. The resulting product would be low quality compost (as it's likely to be contaminated with glass and would be unsuitable for a number of uses).

    The main benefit of retaining the two bin system is that nothing changes for households. The main  disadvantage of this system is that the sorting process will not produce compost of a very high (or valuable) standard as opposed to people sorting garden and food scraps into a separate (third) bin.

    What's more important to you? Remain with two bins that produce a low quality compost or switch to three bins that produce a high quality compost? Why?

    One option for Council is to establish a facility that can process your normal rubbish bin and sort the organic waste (food scraps and garden waste) from the normal rubbish. The resulting product would be low quality compost (as it's likely to be contaminated with glass and would be unsuitable for a number of uses).

    The main benefit of retaining the two bin system is that nothing changes for households. The main  disadvantage of this system is that the sorting process will not produce compost of a very high (or valuable) standard as opposed to people sorting garden and food scraps into a separate (third) bin.

    What's more important to you? Remain with two bins that produce a low quality compost or switch to three bins that produce a high quality compost? Why?

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    One of the considerations for Council is using the waste collected in your normal rubbish bin to generate energy from waste using a refuse derived fuel facility. This would provide green energy to feed back into the electricity grid to produce power and extend the life of our landfills.

    What do you think about establishing a facility that harnesses energy from waste? What do you see as the benefits and do you have any concerns?

    One of the considerations for Council is using the waste collected in your normal rubbish bin to generate energy from waste using a refuse derived fuel facility. This would provide green energy to feed back into the electricity grid to produce power and extend the life of our landfills.

    What do you think about establishing a facility that harnesses energy from waste? What do you see as the benefits and do you have any concerns?

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    Sunshine Coast Council has a strong commitment to reducing waste and landfill. Council's Waste Minimisation Strategy that was developed in 2009 has a target of 70% diversion of waste from landfill by 2014. Currently 29% is being diverted through kerbside recycling and greenwaste services. The state government has also set a target of 50% diversion of waste from landfill by 2020.

     

    Sunshine Coast Council has a strong commitment to reducing waste and landfill. Council's Waste Minimisation Strategy that was developed in 2009 has a target of 70% diversion of waste from landfill by 2014. Currently 29% is being diverted through kerbside recycling and greenwaste services. The state government has also set a target of 50% diversion of waste from landfill by 2020.

     

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    While many of us are keen to reduce household waste and landfill, it is sometimes not easy for us to do so. Saying no to plastic, using cloth nappies, composting and buying food that has little or no packaging can be seen as time consuming, costly or impractical.

    While many of us are keen to reduce household waste and landfill, it is sometimes not easy for us to do so. Saying no to plastic, using cloth nappies, composting and buying food that has little or no packaging can be seen as time consuming, costly or impractical.

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